The first of the Onya Andorid consoles are being dispatched, unsettling or competitive

With many of the next generation consoles either being released (WiiU) or scheduling to be released in the next year (PlayStation 4 & next generation Xbox). But considering the surfacing of mobile and pc tablet gaming, the consoles have more competition than ever before, and leading this charge is the crowd funded Android Ouya console. The unit attracted $8m (£5.3m) when it happening in July 2012 and in 30 days collecting 900% above the projected target, from 63,416 backers.

 

The console offers all of the games that the android Operating system offers, they mostly offer cheap, bite size games that fit in the smart phone marketplace. So for Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft it’s going to offer games in a different market, but possibly taking that time away from playing games and consoles. But there is a universal rise in indie start-ups, that Sony has picked up upon not like Nintendo and Microsoft that don’t offer the same. These Indie designers are more likely to show more of an interest in the unit. With conventional games costing between £30-40, the android games are considerably less expensive and at times at no cost.

 

gaming analyst Piers Harding-Rolls, from IHS says

 

“The space of TV gaming is getting to that point where it’s the one area that hasn’t been significantly disrupted,” adding “It will get the existing console companies to be more aggressive in their business models, opening up their distribution channels.”.

 

The Onya is the first console of its kind, but it’s not an special product, it can and will, be recreated many times over by any business, with very similar initiatives already in the offering for instance UK company Gamestick, Nvidia’s Project Shield and also the decidedly anticipated Steam box, coming later in the year/

 

The unit is on sale now for $99 (£65) and the first pre orders are being dispatched now, expect to find out more about this in the weeks to come.

 

Original Source – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21954641